Lucretius on the nature of things. De rerum natura 2019-02-20

Lucretius on the nature of things Rating: 9,2/10 1887 reviews

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lucretius on the nature of things

These must therefore be made up of elements of different shapes; for smell enters in where color does not pass, color is sensed in one way, and taste in another; so that you know they differ in the shapes of their first elements. This focus on pleasure led critics of Epicurus to characterize his philosophy often unfairly as a kind of irresponsible, hedonistic creed that was against the best interests of society. There are common elements, but the sums are different. Sensible seeds would be soft and therefore mortal. For as dogs ranging over mountains often find by scent the lairs of wild beasts shrouded under leafage, when once they are set on sure traces of their track, so for yourself you will be able in such themes as this to see one thing after another, to win your way to all the secret places and draw out the truth thence.


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Lucretius De Rerum Natura Summary

lucretius on the nature of things

Lucretius's task was to clearly state and fully develop these views in an attractive form; his work was an attempt to show through poetry that everything in nature can be explained by natural laws, without the need for the intervention of divine beings. They came to understand how to use bronze before they learned of iron, because bronze is easier to work and supplies of it are larger. Do you not see too how, when the barriers are flung open, yet for an instant of time the eager might of the horses cannot burst out so suddenly as their mind itself desires? And differences among various natures of human beings and in the habits which arise from them must exist in many other matters. For always new rays of light are pouring out, and the former perish, like wool drawn into a flame. The period is important because it gives us an idea of the background in which the text was written.

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On the Nature of Things by Titus Lucretius Carus

lucretius on the nature of things

Reading Lucretius is like reading the dreams of Darwin or Newton interpreted by the hand of Shakespeare. Nay indeed, how many a dream may they even now conjure up before you, which might avail to overthrow your schemes of life, and confound in fear all your fortunes. For because it is fluid, it is of smooth and round particles, and many rugged bodies mingled in it give birth to pain; and yet it must needs be that they are not hooked and held together: you must know that they are nevertheless spherical, though rugged, so that they can roll on together and hurt the senses. For surely they would not be torn away 450 and fall so suddenly, if they withstood from time immemorial all blows of age and never cracked. Even so, since we cannot with the eyes descry all things, you may know that some things are made bereft of colour, just as some are without any smell and far parted from sound, yet that the keen mind can come to know them no less than it can mark those devoid of other things. For right deep within this nature lies hid far below, nor is there anything further beneath than this in our bodies, and it is moreover the very soul of the whole soul.


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LibriVox

lucretius on the nature of things

This—apart from the last detail, which some have found credible—is a palpable fabrication. Instead they stayed quiet, buried in sleep, until sun with his rosy torch brought light into the sky. Why we may see worms come forth alive from noisome dung, when the soaked earth has gotten muddiness from immeasurable rains; moreover, we may see all things in like manner change themselves. To some extent a small thing may afford An image of great things, a footprint of a concept. You may be sure that that must needs come to pass by a fixed law. Epicurus then has his answer at once: pleasure is the moral good; sensation tells us so, and we cannot attempt to go behind it. Lucretius is arguing against the notion that nature is somehow filled with divine attributes or sensation.

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On the Nature of Things (Watson translation) : Titus Lucretius Carus : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

lucretius on the nature of things

Why doesn't anyone write pop science books like this any more? But if you are slack or shrink a little from my theme, this I can promise you, Memmius, on my own word: so surely will my sweet tongue pour forth to you bounteous draughts from the deep well-springs out of the treasures of my heart, that I fear lest sluggish age creep over our limbs and loosen within us the fastenings of life, before that the whole store of proofs on one single theme be launched in my verses into your ears. We can see things in the light out of darkness, because the light clears the eyes; but not in the darkness out of light, because the darkness chokes the eyes. Earthly power and the terrors of Religion. I traverse, where no foot has ever trod. The imposing structure of the State-worship, raised as the primitive agricultural community developed into a commercial city, and consolidated when the great wave of Greek culture anthropomorphized numina into dei, gave them temples and statues, and organized ceremonials and priesthoods, remained still untouched in form, but the form was empty. Opening of the 1483 manuscript copy of De rerum natura by Girolamo di Matteo de Tauris, which had been copied for.

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The Way Things are Quotes by Lucretius

lucretius on the nature of things

They strove to bloom in full maturity but were unable to—they could find no food or unite in sexual reproduction. For touch, yea touch, by the holy powers of the gods, is the sense of the body, either when something from without finds its way in, or when a thing which is born in the body hurts us, or gives pleasure as it passes out, or else when the seeds after collision jostle within the body itself and, roused one by another, disturb our sense: as if by chance you should with your hand strike any part of your own body and so make trial. Indeed, he defends this latter Epicurean paradox by deploying a classic self-refutation argument against the sceptical alternative: to deny that we have access to knowledge through the senses its only possible entry route is a philosophical stance that disqualifies its own adherents by depriving them of any possible grounds for its assertion 4. The length of this period is hotly debated, but it must necessarily be a fixed and definite time. For since those born blind, who have never descried the light of the sun, yet know bodies by touch, never linked with colour for them from the outset of their life, you may know that for our mind too, bodies painted with no tint may become a clear concept. Do not peoples and nations quake, and are not proud monarchs smitten with fear of the gods, worrying that for some foul transgression or unrighteous word the time of final reckoning has arrived? Death preserves it all, except for vital sense and warming heat. However, Lucretius was a poet in his day, not a mathematician or noted natural philosopher, and thus he is not necessarily a qualified spokesperosn for his era's understanding of the physical universe.

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Lucretius

lucretius on the nature of things

This terror then, this darkness of the mind, must needs be scattered, not by the rays of the sun and the gleaming shafts of day, but by the outer view and the inner law of nature. Soothing joys move round this region, too. Not one, I trow, when everything alike will be altogether as mortal as the things we see clearly before our eyes vanquished by some violence and passing away. There is too the peculiar frenzy of the mind and forgetfulness of the past, yes, and it is plunged into the dark waters of lethargy. Thus you may hold with conviction that distinct basic elements compose the many things that we see, in the same way that we see distinct letters of the alphabet composing many different words.


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Lucretius, On the Nature of Things, Book 5 (English Text)

lucretius on the nature of things

Will our own science someday be viewed as being similarly naive? A professed believer in the mortality of the soul is often insincere. Men who are sick of being home often issue forth from their mansions, but just as suddently come back to it, once they find that they are no better off abroad. But if the level waters of the ocean were made of sky-blue seeds, they could in no wise grow white. Το έργο αυτό κατατάσσεται άνετα στα μεγάλα ποιητικά των Λατίνων μαζί με την Αινειάδα του Βιργίλιου και τις Μεταμορφώσεις του Οβίδιου. The same goes with the idea of smell, that we smell things because particles drift into our nose which causes the nerves in our nose to react to the particle. Book 4 explains the nature of sensation and thought, and ends with an impressive account of sexual love. The fact that there were many seeds of things in the earth when it first brought forth living creatures does not prove that the earth could have produced beasts of different kinds mixed together.

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On the Nature of Things

lucretius on the nature of things

That this is so, if you give attention, you may be able to learn from this. The existence of such images is proved by parallels in the visible world. There is no tedious sniping at current beliefs apart from a rather funny bit towards the end about why Jupiter does not hurl thunderbolts; and he has This is one of the best-argued cases for atheism I have read speaking as a non-atheist. In the sphere of conduct, of action and suffering, has immediate sensation any evidence to give us comparable to the evidence of sense-perception in the field of knowledge? Wherefore what the long limitless age of days, the age of all time that is gone by, had broken ere now, disordering and dissolving, could never be renewed in all time that remains. The shapes of the atoms. However, since we see in our bodies where the mind and soul can exist and grow in their own place, so we must all the more 1100 deny they can be born and continue totally outside the body.

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Lucretius De Rerum Natura Summary

lucretius on the nature of things

Again, we often behold a man pass away little by little and limb by limb lose the sensation of life; first of all the toes and nails on his feet grow livid, then the feet and legs die, thereafter through the rest of his frame, step by step, pass the traces of chill death. The soul consists of two parts. But that nothing at all swerves from the straight direction of its path, what sense is there which can descry? In cases of mortification, the soul perishes bit by bit with the body. For though he may not be noticed by gods and men, he must still be concerned whether his secret will remain concealed forever, since many men frequently talk in their sleep or grow delirious from sicknesses and give themselves away, and, so we are told, publicly reveal their concealed transgressions and wicked deeds. It's probably more important than Newton in terms of the sheer range of thought he originates. For what can one imagine more paradoxical, more inconsistent, 1110 a greater inherent contradiction, than that something mortal should be combined with something immortal and eternal and, united with it, should then endure raging storms? That is why, to repeat myself, when the whole covering of body has collapsed and vital breath has been expelled outside, you must agree sensations in the mind and soul dissolve, since for body and soul, the cause of death is linked inseparably. In his Life of Virgil, , a grammarian and teacher of , noted that put on the toga virilis the toga of an adult in his 17th year, on his birthday i.

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