Sonnet 130 annotated. SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 130 2019-02-11

Sonnet 130 annotated Rating: 8,5/10 131 reviews

Graphic Annotations

sonnet 130 annotated

The poet asks his beloved to accuse him of neglect, stipulating that it was not true neglect, but a test of the beloved's love and constancy. Sometime after 1612, Shakespeare retired from the stage and returned to his home in Stratford. The anapest is sometimes substituted for the iambus. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Only my plague thus far can I count my gain, that she that makes me sin awards me pain.

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 annotated

Than the horrid breath of my mistress. Paraphrase: What is your substance, what are you made of, that millions of shadows attend on you? Together they raised two daughters: Susanna, who was born in 1583, and Judith whose twin brother died in boyhood , born in 1585. He produced most of his work in a 23-year-period. This sonnet is a futurecast—a lamentation of love to be lost. The sonnet: its origin, structure, and place in poetry. She may detain, but she cannot keep her treasure forever: her final accounting, though delayed, must be settled, and her quietus is to surrender you to Time and death. The poet's tribute to his beloved friend continues from the preceding sonnet when the poet declares that his friend's outward appearance lacks nothing that imagination could supply and he is not the only one who thinks so: all voices agree, even foes.

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Poetic Devices Used in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 annotated

In a sense, the poem is about the flawed nature of love poetry, with its idealization of women. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. It's a confusion shared by the speaker as well as the reader of the. The poet wonders why his beloved friend should have to live in a world replete with ills the infections listed in the preceding sonnet. In the first quatrain he describes the looks of his mistress, while in the second quatrain he relates how these looks affect him. I do forgive your robbery, gentle love-thief, although you steal all of the little I have left, and yet, as love knows, it is a greater grief to bear love's wrong than hate's known injury.


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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 annotated

Paraphrase: If you survive my day of death, when that churl Death shall cover my bones with dust, and if you should by chance once more read over these poor rude lines of verse written by me, your deceased lover, compare them with better poetry produced by the passage of time, and though they be outstripped by every pen, keep them with you for the sake of my love, not for their rhyme, as the rhyme will be exceeded by the high poetic achievement of more fortunate men. We might normally expect poets, especially those of Shakespeare's time, to praise the women they love by telling us that their eyes do shine like the sun. Paraphrase: Then let not winter's ragged hand deface in you your summer, before you be distilled like flowers are distilled to make perfume : make sweet some vial; enrich you some place with beauty's treasure, before it your beauty be killed by yourself dying without an heir. The poet uses various arguments to persuade the fair youth to produce children. The mere truththat is hard to ignore is what Shakespeare enshrines into the 18 sonnets the honesty of love, true love. Paraphrase: My mirror shall not persuade me I am old, so long as youth and you are the same age; but when I behold time's furrows in your forehead, then I expect that my death will soon make amends for my life. In Sonnet 138, he used word plays, paradoxes, and metaphors to give depth to the meaning of the poem.

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 annotated

The poet decries the savage power of lust and the God who makes men thus , lust which propels men beyond reason in a quest that, once achieved, causes remorse and woe. Also uses long vowel sounds. And, to enlighten you, gave eyes to blindness made up positive qualities that did not exist , or made them my eyes swear against the thing they saw; for I have sworn you fair; more perjured I, to swear against the truth so foul a lie! In Sonnet 130, the speaker describes the woman that he loves in extremely unflattering terms but claims that he truly loves her, which lends credibility to his claim because even though he does not find her attractive, he still declares his love for her. New York: Haskell House, 1970. But if you live and want not to be remembered, die single, and your image dies with you.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 57

sonnet 130 annotated

You turn faults into graces, as on the finger of a queen, the least valuable jewel will be well-esteemed, just like those errors in you that are seen to be truths. But Shakespeare ends the sonnet by proclaiming his love for his mistress despite her lack of adornment, so he does finally embrace the fundamental theme in Petrarch's sonnets: total and consuming love. The York and Lancaster rose is red and white streaked, symbolic of the union of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York. All these I surpass in one general best: your love is better than high birth to me, richer than wealth, more of an object of pride than garments' cost and more delightful than hawks or horses can be. Paraphrase: When in the account of bygone time I see descriptions of the fairest persons, and beauty making beautiful old poetry in praise of ladies dead and lovely knights, then in the glorification of sweet beauty's best formed hand, foot, lip, eye or brow, I see their pen of old would have expressed even such beauty as you have now. In contrast, whomever Nature best endowed—such as you—she gave the more; which bounteous gift you should cherish because of its bounty; she carved your for her seal, and meant thereby that you should print more copies of yourself, not let the original copy die. He rationalizes that his self-love would be wicked, were not the beloved and the poet one, so that when he praises himself he is really praising his beloved, who is truly worthy of the praise.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 annotated

Profitless usurer, why do you use so great a sum of sums, yet cannot live fulfilled? Yet neither the nests of birds nor the sweet smell of many varied flowers could tell me a pleasant summer story, nor induce me to pick them. But do not do so; I love you in such a way that, you being mine, what belongs to me is your good reputation. Paraphrase: How can I then return in a happy state, when I am barred the benefit of rest? So, if he thrives under your patronage and I am shipwrecked, the worst thing about this situation would be this: my love was my ruin. The passage of time and its impact on relationships, as well as the portrayal of love and beauty, are major concerns in many individual sonnets. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet 130 is important to its effect.

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Graphic Annotations

sonnet 130 annotated

Thus he is crowned with outward praise on his appearance, but those same voices speak differently about the beauty of his mind which they deduce from his actions: they become churls although their eyes were kind and add the rank smell of weeds to the flower of his beauty. He is widely regarded as the greatest English writer of all time, and wrote 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and 38 plays, though recently another play has been found and attributed to William Shakespeare. The poet admits to his beloved that he has been as constant or true as he should have, but he is now returning, never to stray again. Weary of all these travesties, the poet would be gone, except that dying would leave his love alone. That edition, The Sonnets of Shakespeare, consists of 154 sonnets, all written in the form of three quatrains and a couplet that is now recognized as Shakespearean. He then quickly switches over to using the metaphors to compare the rest of his mistress' characteristics, such as her breasts to snow and hair to wires.

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