Tar creek documentary. Tar Creek Superfund site 2019-02-12

Tar creek documentary Rating: 5,9/10 856 reviews

Tar Creek (film)

tar creek documentary

In the 1960s and 1970s, health and environmental hazards were found at mining and industrial sites across America, such as and. The originally owned the area and leased property to mining companies. The State of Oklahoma restored 329 acres of contaminated land in 2005, and the following year offered a voluntary buyout to affected families with children. From 1900 to the 1960s and companies left open behind until the present day. Zinc and lead were used for bullets during both World Wars. Additionally, the Quapaw Tribe and other local advocacy groups are still actively working with the federal and state governments to remediate their lands.

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Tar Creek Superfund site

tar creek documentary

The film makers and those who were interviewed have done a tremendous service by presenting the many lessons to what I hope is a large audience. You have a right to your opinion, Pamela. Despite these environmental hazards, many people in Picher desperately wished to stay and revitalize their town. Students viewing it will certainly grasp both the extreme care required in the extraction of vital resources and the potentially devastating costs of carelessness. That all changed when it was discovered that Tar Creek had one of the deepest reservoirs of lead-zinc ore in the world. I am upset by the vicious attacks made to these people that simply want to remember there childhood. Once one of the largest lead and zinc mines on the planet, Tar Creek is now home to more than 40 square miles of environmental devastation in northeastern Oklahoma: acid mine water in the creeks, stratospheric lead poisoning in the children, and sinkholes that melt backyards and ball fields.


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Tar Creek (film)

tar creek documentary

Between 1915 and 1930, decreasing demand and production caused mining companies to buy the land rather than lease it, which led to high consolidation of companies. This is Picher, Oklahoma, an American exclusion zone. The Tar Creek Superfund site was the subject of a documentary film, Tar Creek. In 1980, Picher first recorded contaminated water drawn from the town's. Another indication of hazard is the 24% miscarriage rate for women in the area, compared to a national average of 10%. Photos by , Original content copyright Sonic Tremor Media Facebook no longer shows Ghosts of North America's posts to the majority of our followers, so the best way to make sure you see our newest posts is to subscribe to our email list. Yet I have sometimes ventured as far as to the mouth of my Snug Harbor.


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Review: Tar Creek, the nation’s worst environmental disaster you’ve never heard of

tar creek documentary

Somewhere on or next to Main Street was where there was a collapse into a mine, which is what really got the ball rolling on buying out the town. During World War I, the region supplied 45 percent of the lead and 50 percent of the zinc used by the U. One of them is no longer with us. Responsibility: from Jump the Fence Producations ; in association with 42 Productions ; produced by Tanya Beer, Matt Myers ; written and directed by Matt Myers. The E-mail message field is required.

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Tar Creek — The Nation's Worst Environmental Disaster. Hear the Story.

tar creek documentary

Description: 1 videodisc 96 min. . I would be happy as would my Dad to share these pictures of Picher in its hay day. Its hard to picture the town as it used to be, I can barely make out the houses where my family lived or the gas station, Picher express. Only a carefully organized visual presentation like his can vividly bring to life, for a general audience, the blend of science, economics, politics, history and raw human misery that are bound up in an environmental disaster of such scale. Water from the region eventually drains into the , which has raised lead levels in the lake. I can remember visiting Picher to see my grandmother Edith Harper and great-grandmother Clementine Quiet when I was a kid and sliding down those chat hills.

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Tar Creek

tar creek documentary

No other location even comes close to the scale that lead was mined in picher. Sad, but the beautiful little picturesque Christian Church on the edge of town in Picher was burned to the ground this year. Explores the links between the hundreds of toxic pollutants in our environment and increasing health problems. The chat is toxic, and the fine grains from the chat piles blow all over town, settle on everything and people breathe them in. Ran the chats from Prosperity to Picher.

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Tar Creek

tar creek documentary

The Quapaw tended to be excluded by discrimination in the industry. Growing up in Vinita I remember Picher well in the 1990s and had a few friends in that town but I do see, after the dust off loss and tragedy has settled that somehow beauty can be seen in the now quiet stillness of a modern day ghost town. It is one of, if not the worst, industrial environmental disaster in the United States, and one of very few industrial exclusion zones on the planet. We were not just a town we were all family and we still are! The film, simply titled Tar Creek, provides a searing portrait of human and natural damage wrought upon a 47-square-mile area in northeastern Oklahoma now known as the Tar Creek Superfund site, where residents are still seeking relief from acidic mine water in creeks, lead poisoning of children, and sinkholes that swallow backyards of contaminated houses. In fact, these two goals are inseparable and must always be so.


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Tar Creek (film)

tar creek documentary

Description: 1 videodisc 96 min. The Oklahoma Plan for Tar Creek claimed around 75 million tons of chat piles exist, while the exact amount of tailings is unknown. In 1979, the first contaminated springs of water were documented. Native peoples pay the consequences of uranium mining. Look closely at the photo below. Thank you for posting the pictures they bring back a lot of memories.

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Independent Lens . THE CREEK RUNS RED . The Film

tar creek documentary

I will miss my home town. The construction of railroads in the area stimulated production, increasing access to markets. During my childhood in the 1940s, Picher was an up-and-running town that offered everything needed to live and shop there. The trees were orange, I had an orange ring around my bathtub and the water came out orange. You wanna remember Picher fondly and gloss over all the shittiness, start your own website — PicherMemories. This is where the real tragedy lies—a tribe that has already been once removed from its ancestral homelands is left with an immense amount of waste on the land they were relocated to. Once a gorilla always a gorilla! The film makers and those who were interviewed have done a tremendous service by presenting the many lessons to what I hope is a large audience.

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